Daylighting

By Anna Rosenberg
Photos by Mountain Home Photos

There was one objective for this home; The homeowners wanted to capture every imaginable view of Aspen Highlands, downtown Aspen and the Valley. They and their guests were to relish in the incredible outdoor light and scenery throughout every room of the nearly 12,000-squrefoot residence. This desire framed the design of the home.

You are constantly being invited outdoors. We wanted the landscape to continually beckon the homeowners and guests to enjoy the exterior spaces simultaneously with the interior,” says the home’s architect, Jamie L. Brewster McLeod, president of Brewster McLeod Architects, Inc. With decks and patios located directly off each of the six bedrooms, this further enhanced the natural ambiance of this four-acre mountain abode.

By optimizing views, the homeowners were also able to create an extremely efficient energy plan for the house with the use of daylighting. “Daylighting” is an ancient technique of designing a structure to allow the maximum amount of natural light into a space. Home designers accomplish this through the use of mirrors, windows and skylights.

“The 50 windows and nine exterior doors in this home speak directly to their appreciation of the landscape and energy efficient mechanisms,” says Jeff Davis, president of Richard A. Wax & Associates, the builder.

Left: A lawn in Aspen; a rarity and luxury! The heavily landscaped exterior, including a private water feature, simply adds to the ambiance of the sensational grounds of the home.

Above: The limestone surrounding the indoor pool is durable, and the water drains are literally drilled into the limestone to create the look of a seamless deck; It appears as a monolithic slab. The automatic pool cover ensures safety. The incredible light well next to the pool reiterates the daylighting technique used throughout the home.

Glass divides the exercise and recreation room allowing for maximum natural ambiance in the spa. Highlights of this indoor pool and spa include an exercise room, multiple showers, a steam shower and sauna.

Left: The kitchen layout reflects the heart of the space and an eternal communal point. “We made sure to allow for extra living space in association with the kitchen design,” says Brewster McLeod. “This is where families tend to gather the majority of the time. It had to be functional and comfortable with a certain level of sophistication.”

Incorporation of a small work area—a mini-office—addresses the thoughtful use of the shared area. A butler’s pantry, for additional storage behind the bank of built-in refrigerators and freezers, highlights traditional conveniences for a multigenerational retreat. Local carpenter, Eurostyle Woodworking provided the custom cabinets for every storage need throughout the kitchen.

“This is the first home I have designed with an entire floor dedicated to a master suite,” says Brewster McLeod. Her intent was to make the 2,000-square-foot master suite a retreat. No matter how many guests were occupying the home, it was designed to be a haven for the couple; a true escape. The five-room master suite includes the bedroom, his and her private dressing areas, closets and bathrooms with a lounging area to reconnect the couple. Expansive views and a private deck complete the signature indoor/ outdoor connections throughout the suite.

Resources

Architect: Jamie L. Brewster McLeod, AIA
Brewster McLeod Architects, Inc., Aspen
970.544.0130 | brewstermcleod.com

Builder/Developer: Richard A. Wax & Associates, LLC, Aspen
970.920.0236 | waxassociates.com